Vegetable Varieties for Gardeners is a citizen science program







'Doe Hill Golden' Peppers
 
Sub-Category: Sweet
 
Description: Heirloom sweet frying pepper. 24-inch plants bear 4- to 6-lobed, flat bell-shaped, 2 1/4- by 1-inch green fruit ripening to bright orange. Widely adapted and disease-resistant.
Days To Maturity: NA
Seed Sources:
 
Rating Summary
 
Overall: (5.0 Stars)Overall
Taste: (4.5 Stars)Taste
Yield: (4.5 Stars)Yield
Ease/Reliability: (5.0 Stars)Ease/Reliability
 
Reviews
 
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Number of Reviews: 2

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KEY: O=Overall Rating, T=Taste, Y=Yield, E=Ease

Reviewed on 10/02/2011 by Ferdzy - An intermediate gardener

Overall Overall
Taste Taste
Yield Yield
Ease/Reliability Ease

Ontario, Canada
Frost Free Season: 143 - 163 days
Soil Texture: Sand
Garden Size: Large - More than 1,600 square feet (40' x 40')
Sun Exposure: More than 8 hours per day

I was excited to find this pepper because it looks and tastes much like a small slightly flattened bell pepper, but unlike bell peppers (ugh) it gives me no indigestion. This is a nice, compact little plant that started producing fairly early and kept on going at a steady pace all season. Like bell peppers, they can be eaten when green or when they ripen to yellow, and oh man, are they sweet and delicious when yellow.
 

Reviewed on 10/24/2009 by Nancy W - An experienced gardener

Overall Overall
Taste Taste
Yield Yield
Ease/Reliability Ease

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Frost Free Season: 183 - 203 days
Soil Texture: Loam
Garden Size: Large - More than 1,600 square feet (40' x 40')
Sun Exposure: More than 8 hours per day

This is my favorite sweet pepper so far, the one I keep growing while I try others, because it produces very reliably for me. Lots of small cheese-type fruit, ripening by early-mid August from mid-May transplants. One year I nearly killed my entire pepper crop by planting them into a bed which had been mulched the previous fall with shredded leaves; everything was stunted and yellow from lack of nitrogen despite remedial feeding; this was the only pepper of 6 varieties which eventually recovered and managed to produce ripe fruit.
 
1 of 1 gardener found this review helpful.  




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